The Dig

The Dig

Guerrilla Girls

The Guerrilla Girls have been keeping tabs on the gender and racial disparities in the art world since their inception in 1985. Through this group, an ever-changing roster of anonymous art professionals has shed light on identity politics and discrimination, running highly publicized campaigns across the globe. Who are they? The Baltimore Museum of Art, who obtained and exhibited a portfolio retrospective of their work, isn’t telling.

The Dig: Guerrilla Girls

Senior Curator of Contemporary Art Kristen Hileman says she hopes the exhibit will bring attention to the “tangled web” behind the historical focus on particular types of art and artists. Through bold graphics and a humorous approach, the Guerrilla Girls exhibit presents research and statistics on art from Venice to Hollywood, pointing to flaws in representation throughout galleries, publications, auctions, and museums.

Donning the names of deceased female artists, as well as gorilla masks to preserve their anonymity, the Guerrilla Girls continue to shed light on the past, while attempting to improve parity in the future. The group is still active, and continues to be what Hileman refers to as a “visible and vital force,” keeping the art world on its toes.

Footage courtesy of: The Contemporary and Area 405

Stills courtesy of: The Guerrilla Girls

The Dig: Guerrilla Girls