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Maryland Farm & Harvest: Episode 602

Premiere air date: Tuesday, November 20, 2018 at 7pm on MPT-HD

Program preview

Episode Description

  • On this episode, we take a look at how to build a Maryland-grown Thanksgiving meal! In our first segment, we travel to Hancock Family Farms in Charles County, where farmer David Hancock raises the centerpiece of the Thanksgiving meal—the turkey. Hancock Family Farms also sells beef, chicken, lamb, pork, and produce directly from the farm, but they’re known in the community for holding fundraisers to help those in need, both locally and across the country.
  • Sweet potatoes, whether they’re mashed or in a casserole, are a Thanksgiving staple. Farmer Greg Williams of Columbia Creek Farm in Hebron raises 55 acres of corn and soybeans, and he’s also got an acre planted with sweet potatoes. But Greg doesn’t just your typical orange sweet potatoes. He also raises a purple sweet potato and Hayman white sweet potatoes—an Eastern Shore favorite.
  • Farmer Mary Jane Roop makes a mean pumpkin pie, but the appreciation for pumpkins at her farm, Brookfield Pumpkins in Frederick County, goes beyond the traditional Thanksgiving dessert. Mary Jane and her husband Sam have thirteen acres of pumpkins and gourds with about forty different varieties for customers to choose from. Sam also manages 300 acres of crops, but he and his wife prefer the fall, when they’re able to connect with the community at the pumpkin patch.
  • The Local Buy: Al Spoler visits Benjamin’s Landing at Lowe Farms in Harford County where farmer Bobbie Lowe shares with him her passion for unique gourds used in crafting decor. She’ll take us through the tedious process of pollinating some of her more unique varieties before inviting Al to learn to learn to decorate one himself in the barn at the family’s nearby bicentennial farm, The Wright Place.
  • Then & Now: Gourds

Production stills

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Thingamajig

Potato Ricer

This antique potato ricer is used to process cooked potatoes by forcing them through the tiny holes, making smooth mashed potatoes.

Thingamajig provided by the Howard County Living Farm Heritage Museum.