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Voices of Baltimore: Black, White and Gray

Baltimore has seen more than one dark day, but no one was prepared to witness what took place on April 27, 2015 following the death of Freddie Gray. Moved by the unrest, Maryland Public Television was able to gather stories from residents living in the city to voice their thoughts and concerns behind what some call the darkest days of Baltimore’s history.

This compilation of short narratives will shed light on the events of the day with the hope that our viewers will gain better insight into a community that feels their voices have been unheard for decades.

Additional segments will be presented over the coming weeks.

Dominique Stevenson

Dominique Stevenson

The “historically significant” Tubman House, located near where Freddie Gray was arrested, is a site for community programs, and this activist is fighting to preserve it.

Makayla Gilliam-Price

Makayla Gilliam-Price

Active in politics from a young age, the Baltimore uprising further motivated Makayla to help mobilize Baltimore youth and connect them to efforts at legislative reform.

Meghann Harris

Meghann Harris

A passionate Baltimore City school teacher gives her account of how the riots actually started, and what students living in the city are faced with every day.

Kwame Rose

Kwame Rose

A Baltimore activist and public speaker thrust into the eye of the Freddie Gray storm, Rose remains passionate about inspiring young people to advocate for their own neighborhoods.

Ericka Alston - Kids Safe Zone

Ericka Alston - Kids Safe Zone

A life-long city resident fills a need in her community by providing a safe place where children can play and thrive.

Rev. Rodney Hudson

Rev. Rodney Hudson

The leader at Ames Memorial United Methodist Church, Rev. Hudson hopes that community policing can shift towards a collaborative model involving the clergy.

Nimoya

Nimoya

While this mother and West Baltimore resident says the Freddie Gray case is “nothing new” to her, she believes the community can begin to improve its relationship with the police.

Ray Kelly

Ray Kelly

This community leader's efforts helped to include unprecedented resident input in the recently-released U.S. Department of Justice report on Baltimore’s police department.

Ashiah Parker - No Boundaries

Ashiah Parker - No Boundaries

Dismayed by the violence of April 2015, Ashiah Parker now continues to support her community through the works done by the No Boundaries Coalition.

Safe Streets

Safe Streets

James Timpson and other street-based outreach workers for Safe Streets worked to quell the violence that erupted in April of 2015.

Rev. Donté L. Hickman

Rev. Donté L. Hickman

The pastor at Southern Baptist Church shares his feelings about losing his $16 million senior center shortly after the Baltimore uprising.

Kevin Davis

Kevin Davis

Baltimore’s Police Commissioner since 2015, Davis advocates for officers to build goodwill with the community but says the relationship will always be a challenge.

Luv Strenx and Kqlm Strqng

Luv Strenx and Kqlm Strqng

Strong community relationships helped them emerge from that April day unscathed, but their business has suffered even as neighborhood recovery efforts continue.

Clayton Williams

Clayton Williams

Manager for a farm in Sandtown-Winchester, Williams was grateful for community support after its greenhouses were damaged and still seeks volunteer help in exchange for food.

Brandon Carroll

Brandon Carroll

Despite doubts about relations between law enforcement and citizens, Carroll hopes that Baltimore residents use their rights to vote and move the community forward.

Brion Gill

Brion Gill

An artist and activist, Gill stresses the importance, especially for young people, of staying connected with your community.

D. Watkins

D. Watkins

An author and professor identifies some positive aspects of the unrest and dedicates his life to bringing greater literacy and critical thinking skills to the city.

Sgt. Louis Hopson

Sgt. Louis Hopson

A member of the Baltimore Police Department for 35 years, Sergeant Louis Hopson advocates for a closer relationship between the police and the public.

Thalia Jamison

Thalia Jamison

An Air Force veteran, business owner, and employer of local residents and kids from the neighborhood lost her store to an electrical fire following the riots.

Beverly D. Cromartie

Beverly D. Cromartie

A Baltimore City native and funeral home director suggests ways to assist African-Americans by addressing some of the pressing issues in their neighborhoods.

Ernest Shaw, Jr.

Ernest Shaw, Jr.

A mural artist and educator in Baltimore City shares his feelings and thoughts behind the unrest that shook the city.

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These stories were made possible by the generous support of The Annie E. Casey Foundation. To learn more about their organization, please visit their website at http://www.aecf.org.