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Direct Connection Guests

Monday, September 23, 2019

The Squeegee Alternative Plan

A look at Mayor Bernard C. "Jack" Young's newly announced 'squeegee alternative plan' meant to provide short and long term solutions to the Baltimore kids who have been seen on street corners trying to make money by washing windshields.

Tisha Edwards
Mayor’s Office of Children & Family Success

Your Health: Behavioral Health Issues

One in five people suffer from behavioral health issues; two of the most common being anxiety and depression. Behavioral health issues are among the priorities for the Harford County Local Health Improvement Coalition and University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health. With its plans for a new medical campus in Aberdeen, UCH plans to offer a full array of critically needed inpatient and outpatient behavioral health services.

Historically, hospitals have delivered “sick” care instead of “health” care and we have trained an entire country to use the emergency room as an entry to the system. The future is really around developing “health” care, both in Maryland and across the country. Keeping our population healthy demands new services that are community-based and, as appropriate, away from hospitals and emergency rooms. Upper Chesapeake Health has developed a number of services over the last several years aimed at keeping our population healthy on both the physical medicine side of the aisle as well as the behavioral health side.

Dr. Richard Mathew Lewis
University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health

Rod L. Kornrumpf
University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health

Monday, September 16, 2019

Local Country Music

As MPT airs the Ken Burns' documentary we talk with local radio host Laurie DeYoung about the local country music scene.

Laurie DeYoung
Morning Show Host, WPOC Baltimore

Your Health: Preventing Sports Injuries

Strains and sprains. Runner’s knee. Tennis elbow. Shin splits. Just a few of the sports injuries that can afflict weekend warriors and student athletes alike. What can you do to prevent the most common sports injuries and maintain a healthy, active lifestyle?

Natalie Leong, MD
University of Maryland Sports Medicine

Monday, September 9, 2019

It's Harvest Season!

Join us as we visit a local winery to learn about the wine making process and the journey of the grape from vine to ... can.

Drew Baker
Old Westminster Winery

Al Spoler
Host, WYPR's Cellar Notes & Radio Kitchen

Monday, September 2, 2019

Responsible Recycling

Chris Phipps
Director, Anne Arundel County Dept. of Public Works

Your Health: How Adverse Childhood Experiences Affect Who We Are

How adverse childhood experiences can impact a person’s health throughout their life.

Kay Connors
Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine

Brittany Parham, PhD
Center for School Mental Health, UM School of Medicine

Monday, August 26, 2019

Maryland State Fair

What's new this year at the Maryland State Fair?

Andrew Cashman
General Manager, Maryland State Fair

Your Health: Sinus infections

For many, the symptoms are all too familiar: pain and pressure in the face on either side of the nose, or the forehead, fever, congestion and cough. Before you know it, what you thought was just a cold has turned into a sinus infection. More than 30 million people in the United States experience sinus infections; for some, they are a chronic condition that seriously impacts their quality of life.

Dr. Andrea Hebert, an assistant professor of otorhinolaryngology-head and neck surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine who treats patients at the University of Maryland Medical Center, will explain what causes sinus infections and how doctors typically treat them. She will also talk about what you can do to help prevent them.

Do you have a general question about sinus infections or other sinus conditions? During the show, call 1-800-926-0629 or e-mail your question to livequestions@mpt.org.

Andrea M. Hebert, MD
University of Maryland Medical Center

Monday, August 19, 2019

Maryland Lottery Record-Breaking Numbers

Gordon Medenica
Director, Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Agency

Your Health: Summer Kidney Stones

Are kidney stones “seasonal”? It seems so. Nearly 4 million people in the U.S. get kidney stones each year, and they are more prevalent in the summer. Kidney stones are made of mineral and acid salts and form when urine becomes concentrated. This “over concentration” happens more often in the summer, due to dehydration, when we tend not to drink as much as we should or we drink the wrong types of fluids—this causes dehydration, which leads to the formation of more kidney stones.

On Monday, August 19, Marc Siegelbaum MD, FACS, chief of urology and director of urologic oncology at University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, will discuss how to avoid, recognize and treat summer kidney stones.

Do you have general questions about kidney stones or male urologic or reproductive health? During the show, call 1-800-926-0629 or email your question to livequestions@mpt.org.

Dr. Marc H. Siegelbaum
UM St Joseph Medical Center

Monday, August 12, 2019

Summer In Ocean City

Do you have questions for Ocean City mayor, Rick Meehan? Send them to livequestions@mpt.org.

Rick Meehan
Ocean City Mayor

Your Health: Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke

Although atrial fibrillation, or AFib, can feel scary, it usually doesn’t have harmful consequences by itself. The real danger is the increased risk for stroke. Even when symptoms are not noticeable, AFib can increase a person’s risks for stroke and related heart problems.

Dr. Seemant Chaturvedi, professor of neurology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and director of the stroke division for the University of Maryland Medical System, will discuss the connection between AFib and stroke, as well as results from a recent study he led that suggests that significantly more stroke deaths can be prevented if people’s AFib conditions were better managed.

Dr. Seemant Chaturvedi
Professor of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine

Monday, August 5, 2019

What You Need To Know About DNA Testing

Andy Hochreiter
Genetic Genealogist

Chuck Haine
Genetic Genealogist

Monday, July 29, 2019

Training Camp

With football season starting soon we talk with Ravens leadership about what to expect in the new season.

Dick Cass
President, Baltimore Ravens

Monday, July 22, 2019

Safety In Baltimore

A look at the Baltimore Police Commissioner gun violence fighting plan.

Michael Harrison
Baltimore City Police Commissioner

Reading The Constitution

The importance of reading and understanding the U.S. Constitution.

Kim Wehle
Author, How To Read The Constitution - And Why

Monday, July 15, 2019

Making History - The Apollo 50th Anniversary

The lessons of the Apollo 50th Moon Landing and the future of space exploration.

Dr. James Garvin
Chief Scientist, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Monday, July 8, 2019

What You Need To Know About DNA Testing

Andy Hochreiter
Genetic Genealogist

Chuck Haine
Genetic Genealogist

Monday, July 1, 2019

Summer Grilling

Top tips from a grilling pro to get the most out of your grilling this summer.

Kevin Grenzig
Regional Executive Chef, Wegmans

Your Health: Fireworks Safety

On average, 280 people go to the emergency room every day with fireworks-related injuries in the month around the July 4th holiday, according to the US Consumer Product Safety Commission. More than 30 percent of the injuries are to the hands and fingers.

Dr. Raymond Pensy, a surgeon at the University of Maryland R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center who specializes in treating hand injuries, will discuss the type of damage fireworks can do. Dr. Pensy, who is also an associate professor of orthopaedics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, will offer advice on what people can do to stay safe this July 4th.

Raymond A. Pensy, MD
Associate Professor of Orthopaedics, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Trauma Orthopaedic Surgeon, University of Maryland R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center
University of Maryland Center for Hand and Upper Extremity Care

Monday, June 24, 2019

Snakehead Fish Invasion

This spring has seen an increase in the numbers of snakehead fish swimming upstream the Chesapeake Bay.

Joseph Love
Biologist, DNR

Your Health: Colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in both men and women. Of those diagnosed with this cancer, 91 percent are over 50 years old, and the incidence has been dropping. But the rate has been increasing in adults under 50, and the death rate is also on the rise, even though colonoscopies are more common.

Dr. Andrea Bafford, an assistant professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and a colorectal surgeon at the University of Maryland Medical Center, will discuss this disturbing trend and what might be causing it. She will also talk about diagnosing and treating colorectal cancer as well as screening and prevention.

Andrea Bafford, MD
University of Maryland Medical Center

Monday, June 17, 2019

Massive Medical Data Breach

Attorney General Brian Frosh is warning Marylanders of a massive medical cyber attack that might have compromised patient data.

Brian Frosh
Maryland Attorney General

Monday, June 10, 2019

Responsible Recycling

Chris Phipps
Director, Anne Arundel County Dept. of Public Works

Your Health: How Adverse Childhood Experiences Affect Who We Are

How adverse childhood experiences can impact a person’s health throughout their life.

Kay Connors
Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine

Brittany Parham, PhD
Center for School Mental Health, UM School of Medicine

Monday, June 3, 2019

Home Buying & Selling

Expert advice on buying and selling homes and qualifying for mortgages.

Patty Kallmyer
Branch VP, Coldwell Banker
https://www.coldwellbankerhomes.com/md/lutherville-timonium/agent/patricia-patty-kallmyer/aid_29627/

Heidi Gage
Branch Manager, Movement Mortgage
https://movement.com/lo/heidi-gage/

Monday, May 27, 2019

Values & Activism

A Baltimore born and raised Black Lives Matter activist talks about his values and his new book, On The Other Side of Freedom.

DeRay Mckesson
Civil Rights Activist & Author, On The Other Side Of Freedom

Monday, May 20, 2019

Maryland State Police Ramping Up Enforcement

With summer travel starting, police are cracking down on seat belt use and also enforcing the law requiring drivers to move over for emergency vehicles.

Ron Snyder
Maryland State Police

Your Health: Stroke Prevention

In Maryland, a stroke patient arrives at a hospital every thirty minutes. Strokes affect over 800,000 people each year, are the fifth-leading cause of death in the United States and are the number one leading cause of disability in America. Once thought of as a medical issue affecting primarily people in their older years, that is no longer the case.

Erin Brown, RN - Stroke Certified Registered Nurse
Stroke Coordinator, University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health

Monday, May 13, 2019

Baltimore City System Hacking

Baltimore City got hit by the second ransomware attack last week, forcing officials to shut down city servers. We discuss implications and how can such hacks be prevented.

A.J. Cooke
Security Engineer, Bridges Consulting

Your Health: First-Ever Drone Organ Transportation

The goal of organ transplantation is to save as many lives as possible and provide transplant recipients with the best chance of long-term survival. A complex national system of organ matching, donor and recipient coordinators, transportation companies and teams of clinical specialists, hospitals, and organ procurement organizations resulted in more than 36,000 transplants last year. Even so, nearly 114,000 men, women and children are on the national transplant waiting list this year.

Two transplant specialists from the University of Maryland Medical Center, Rolf Barth, MD, and Joseph Scalea, MD, discuss what’s happening in organ transplantation, including successes and opportunities for improvement, with a special look at a first-ever advance in organ transportation, the use of a drone to deliver a donor kidney to surgeons for successful transplantation in a patient with kidney failure.

Joseph R. Scalea, MD
University of Maryland School of Medicine

Monday, May 6, 2019

Ideas for Turning Baltimore Around

Cyndi Tensley
President, Carrollton Ridge Community Association

Kaye Whitehead Ph.D.
Communication and African & African American Studies, Loyola University

Thiru Vignarajah
Partner, DLA Piper

Monday, April 29, 2019

The Measles outbreak and who might need a booster shot

Dr. Gregory Branch
Baltimore County Department of Health and Human Services
https://www.baltimorecountymd.gov/

Your Health: The Importance of an Advance Directive

Advance care planning is a process that supports adults at any age or stage of health in understanding and sharing their personal values, life goals, and preferences regarding future medical care. Advance care planning often includes the completion of an advance directive. An advance directive documents preferences for medical care, as well as a surrogate healthcare decision-maker – and helps to ensure that patients receive care that is consistent with their wishes. In addition, advance directives provide guidance to the family, relieving them of the "decisional burden" about whether they are following their loved one’s preferences. Some have also suggested that advance care planning—and advance directives—reduce moral distress among healthcare providers, as well.

Dr. Thomas Morgan Pembroke, a UM St. Joseph Medical Center Internal Medicine physician with a specialty in Palliative Care, will discuss the importance of having an advance directive.

Dr. Thomas Morgan Pembroke, M.D.
Internal Medicine & Palliative Care, UM St. Joseph Medical Center

Monday, April 22, 2019

Chesapeake Bay Week - Legislation To Save The Bay

Congressman John Sarbanes leads a bipartisan effort looking to increase bay clean-up and conservation efforts through a five-year federal funding commitment.

Rep. John Sarbanes
(D) Maryland

Your Health: Heart Attacks In Younger Adults

Despite advances in treatment and technology, coronary heart disease remains the number one killer of Americans in both men and women. There are over 1.5 million heart attacks per year and at least half of patients will die before reaching the hospital, often because when the heart muscle is starved for blood, the heart goes into a dangerous rhythm that leads rapidly to death.

Particularly shocking is the increased rate in heart attacks among young people. According to the American Heart Association, people age 50 and younger have almost twice the risk of premature death after a heart attack — mainly due to high blood pressure, smoking and obesity.

Dr. Vasundhara Muthu, a cardiologist with UM Baltimore Washington Medical Center, will discuss what young people need to know about heart disease.

Dr. Vasundhara Muthu
Cardiologist, UM Baltimore Washington Medical Center

Monday, April 15, 2019

Blasting Off From Wallops Island

A mission to the Space Station.

Dave Pierce
Director, Wallops Facility
https://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/home

Black Hole

What the latest discovery means.

Roeland van der Marel
Space Telescope Science Institute

Monday, April 8, 2019

Direct Connection With The Governor

Gov. Larry Hogan joins us for our live show, be sure to send us your questions and comments at livequestions@mpt.org.

Larry Hogan
Maryland Governor

Remembering Speaker Busch

Bryan Sears
The Daily Record

Danielle Gaines
Maryland Matters

Monday, April 1, 2019

Baltimore Mayor Pugh Takes Leave Of Absence

Luke Broadwater
The Baltimore Sun

Is It Time To Pay NCAA Student Athletes?

Dionne Koller
University of Baltimore School of Law

Tony Agnone
Sports Agent, Eastern Athletic Services

Monday, March 25, 2019

The Mueller Report

What's next after the summary of the Mueller Report?

Sen. Chris Van Hollen
(D) Maryland

Monday, March 18, 2019

Raising The Minimum Wage In Maryland

Terry Cavanaugh
Executive Director,SEIU, MD/DC State Council

Mike O'Halloran
State Director, National Federation of Independent Business

Your Health: HIV Latest

A look at the most recent developments in HIV treatment after a couple of HIV-positive patients are now free of the AIDS virus.

Dr. Richard Zhao
University of Maryland School of Medicine

Monday, March 11, 2019

Should The U.S. Ground the Boeing 737 Max 8 Fleet?

Roger Cox
Retired senior air safety investigator, NTSB

Your Health: 3D Printing in Medicine

As the 3D printing industry continues to evolve and grow, medical professionals are starting to use 3D printers to produce anatomically precise models of human organs to diagnose a condition or plan a surgery. Dr. Jeffrey Hirsch, assistant professor of diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and chief of community radiology at the University of Maryland Medical Center, will tell us about the latest advances in 3D printing and how the technology can improve medical care.

Dr. Jeffrey Hirsch
Assistant Professor of Radiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine

Monday, March 4, 2019

Larry Hogan In Iowa

Governor Larry Hogan is visiting Iowa for a National Governors Association event. We discuss the growing speculation about him challenging President Donald Trump in a 2020 Primary.

Mileah Kromer, Ph.D.
Director, Sarah T. Hughes Field Politics Center, Goucher College

Erin Murphy
Des Moines Bureau Chief, Lee Enterprises

Todd Eberly, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, St. Mary's College of Maryland

Fallout From Racial Slur

Harford County Democrats, among others, calling on Del. Mary Ann Lisanti, to resign from Maryland’s House of Delegates.

Ovetta Wiggins
The Washington Post

Monday, February 25, 2019

Innocence Project Clinic

A look at the impact of a law clinic that works to identify individuals who were convicted in Maryland courts of crimes they did not commit.

Michele Nethercott
Innocence Project Clinic, University of Baltimore School of Law

Your Health: Sports Cardiology

We think of athletes as healthy and fit, but both young and older athletes can suffer from heart disease. In younger athletes, heart defects present at birth may affect the structure of the heart, while for older athletes, high blood pressure, blocked heart arteries and abnormal heart rhythm can take their toll.

Geoffrey Rosenthal, MD, PhD, and Scott Jerome, DO, from the University of Maryland Medical Center, discuss heart screening for athletes, the difference between a normal heart and the heart of an athlete, and what you can do to exercise and have a healthy heart.

Geoffrey L. Rosenthal, MD, PhD
University of Maryland School of Medicine

Scott D. Jerome, DO
University of Maryland School of Medicine

Monday, February 18, 2019

Values & Activism

A Baltimore born and raised Black Lives Matter activist talks about his values and his new book, On The Other Side of Freedom.

DeRay Mckesson
Civil Rights Activist & Author, On The Other Side Of Freedom

Monday, February 11, 2019

Valentine's Day Ideas

Business is blooming for florists in the days leading up to Valentine’s Day.

Eddie Wingrat
President, Flowers & Fancies

Your Health: Urgent Care

You can’t plan when an illness or injury will occur, but you can plan to go to a trusted urgent care center. ChoiceOne Urgent Care has partnered with University of Maryland Medical System to offer patients convenient and accessible healthcare when they need it most. Many patients need immediate medical care in the evenings and on the weekend or when they cannot be seen by their primary care provider during the day.

Urgent care is often the most convenient, cost effective and appropriate solution for patients. ChoiceOne Urgent Care and University of Maryland Medical System operate 10 urgent care centers throughout the greater Baltimore area and Maryland’s Eastern Shore, all conveniently located near school, work, and home.

On Monday, February 11, Dr. Scott Burger, chief medical officer at ChoiceOne Urgent Care, will discuss the role of urgent care facilities in providing medical care to the community.

Scott T. Burger, D.O.
ChoiceOne Urgent Care

Monday, February 4, 2019

Previewing President Trump's State of the Union

Susan Turnbull
Former Chair, Maryland Democratic Party

Nicolee Ambrose
Maryland Republican National Committeewoman

Your Health: Adenovirus

Adenoviruses are common viruses that can infect the lining of a person’s eyes, airways and lungs, intestines, urinary tract, and nervous system. They are common causes of fever, coughs, sore throats, diarrhea, and pink eye. Infections happen in children more often than in adults, but anyone can get them.

On Monday, Feb 4, Marie Kanagie-McAleese MD, FAAP, a pediatric hospitalist with University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health, will discuss adenoviruses.

Marie Kanagie-McAleese MD, FAAP
Pediatric Hospitalist, UM Upper Chesapeake Health

Monday, January 28, 2019

Marijuana Farm

An inside look in one of the state's newest cannabis farm.

Michael Bronfein
CEO, Curio Wellness

Monday, January 21, 2019

Government Shutdown and MLK Day

The impact of the now-in-its-fifth-week partial government shutdown plus the significance of the Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

Rep. Anthony Brown
(D) Maryland

Monday, January 14, 2019

Your Health: Prostate Cancer Treatment & Screening

Other than skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American men. The American Cancer Society estimates that nearly 175,000 new cases of prostate cancer will be diagnosed in 2019. Last week, Maryland Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, Jr., announced that he has been diagnosed with prostate cancer and is receiving chemotherapy.

On Monday, January 14, Muhummad Minhaj Siddiqui, MD, associate professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and director of urologic oncology and robotic surgery at the University of Maryland Medical Center, will discuss how prostate cancer is diagnosed and treated.

Minhaj Siddiqui, MD
Director, Urologic Oncology and Robotic Surgery, UMMC

Monday, January 7, 2019

Baltimore Ravens Tickets Sales

Mike Berger
Founder, Berger Sports Marketing

Stan The Fan Charles
Founder, Pressbox

Partial Government Shutdown

Three weeks in, where do we stand now?

Rep. Jamie Raskin
(D) Maryland

Monday, December 17, 2018

Tips For A Perfect Holiday Gift

Having trouble wrapping that perfect gift? You're not alone, so we enlisted some expert help.

Judy Bokx
Greetings & Readings

Your Health: Bladder Health and UTIs

Urinary tract infections or UTIs are painful, annoying and very common. It’s an infection in your urinary system, usually in the bladder and urethra, caused by bacteria. What causes UTIs? What’s the best treatment? Does cranberry juice really help prevent a UTI? Dr. Madeline Dick, a urogynecologist at the University of Maryland Medical Center, will discuss the risk factors, prevention and available treatments.

Dr. Madeline Dick-Biascoechea
University of Maryland School of Medicine

Monday, December 10, 2018

Holiday Gadgets

Finding the gadgets and gizmos that will light up someone's holidays.

Jon Moffett
Best Buy

Monday, December 3, 2018

Getting Your Financial House In Order

Looking to make some money moves in 2019? This is the perfect time to get your financial house in order.

Deborah Owens
CEO ↦ Founder, Wealthy-U

Your Health: Healthy Holiday Eating

Holiday tables are loaded with traditional, family-favorite foods. This is the time of the year when the most calories are consumed! It’s not uncommon for people to gain as much as 10 pounds between the Thanksgiving and New Year’s holidays. Caroline Meehan, a registered dietitian at the University of Maryland Medical Center, will discuss how to avoid some of these pitfalls and eat healthier this holiday season and in the New Year.

Caroline Meehan, RDN, CSOWM, LDN
Dietitian & Nutritionist, University of Maryland Medical Center

Monday, November 26, 2018

Energy Suppliers

How much money residents are savings by choosing their own electricity and energy suppliers?

Paula Carmody
People's Counsel for the State of Maryland

Your Health: Advances in Treating Lung Cancer

Lung cancer is the deadliest cancer among men and women in the U.S. Each year, more people die of lung cancer than of colon, breast, and prostate cancers combined. But progress is being made in treating this common cancer. Dr. Shelby Stewart, an assistant professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and a thoracic surgeon at the University of Maryland Medical Center and University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, will discuss recent advances in treating lung cancer as well as the importance of screening for high-risk individuals.

Shelby Stewart, MD
Thoracic surgeon, University of Maryland Medical Center

Monday, November 19, 2018

Holiday Travel

The holiday season is upon us, and with it comes the holiday rush.

Ricky Smith
CEO, BWI Marshall Airport

Mark Kopczak
Vice President, Network Planning, Spirit Airlines

Monday, November 12, 2018

Your Health: Men's Mental Health / Seniors & Chronic Disease – A Community Conversation

Anxiety. Chronic disease. Depression. Suicide. While these may not be fun topics for people to discuss, they are all vitally important to an individual’s health.

Dr. William T. Regenold
University of Maryland School of Medicine/University of Maryland Medical Center

Donna Jacobs
University of Maryland Medical System

By Phone: Jamal Lewis
Former Running Back, National Football League

Monday, November 5, 2018

Political Ads & Impact

The impact of political commercials in the midterm elections.

Hank Boyd
Clinical Professor, Marketing, Robert H. Smith School of Business

Erin Watley, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Communication & Cinema Department, McDaniel College

Monday, October 29, 2018

Pittsburgh Synagogue Shooting

As Pittsburgh mourns the victims of the Tree of Life Synagogue shooting, communities grapple with reality, healing and safety precautions.

Howard Libit
Executive Director, Baltimore Jewish Council

Alvin Gillard
Executive Director, Maryland Commission On Civil Rights

Your Health: What women need to know about Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women in the United States. Over 200,000 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer each year and over 40,000 will die. However there is hope. Early detection is key in the treatment of breast cancer. For many women symptoms appear, but for some with breast cancer they have no symptoms. This is why regular breast cancer screening and early detection is so important to saving lives.

Dr. Cynthia Drogula, Assistant Professor of Surgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, and a Breast Surgeon & Medical Director of the Aiello Breast Center at UM Baltimore Washington Medical Center’s Tate Cancer Center will be a guest on Maryland Public Television’s Direct Connection “Your Health” show on Monday night, October 29, at 7 p.m. discussing what women (and men) need to know about breast cancer.

Dr. Cynthia Drogula
Breast Surgeon, UM Baltimore Washington Medical Center

Monday, October 22, 2018

The Legacy Of A Happy Painter

Preserving the legacy of Bob Ross while introducing his work and impact to future generations.

Annette Kowalski
Founder, Bob Ross Inc.

Sarah Strohl
Executive Assistant, Bob Ross Inc.

Your Health: What You Need To Know About The Flu Season

The 2017-2018 influenza season in the United States was one of the most severe in recent memory, with sustained and widespread high level of flu activity. According to the Centers for Disease Control, an estimated 80,000 Americans died of influenza and its complications during the 2017-18 season. This is the highest death toll from the flu in at least 4 decades.

Dr. Stacy Garrett-Ray, VP and Medical Director of Population Health for the University of Maryland Medical System and President of the University of Maryland Quality Care Network, is a practicing primary care physician and will be a guest on Maryland Public Television’s Direct Connection “Your Health” show on Monday night, October 22nd at 7 p.m. discussing what individuals need to know as the 2018-19 flu season approaches.

Dr. Stacy Garrett-Ray
Medical Director of Population Health, UMMS

Monday, October 15, 2018

Fighting Baltimore's Crime

A discussion about the challenges Baltimore faces when it comes to lowering its violent crime numbers and the latest changes within the city's police department.

Kevin Davis
Former Police Commissioner, Baltimore City

UMMS